The Blueprint: Visualizing the Future

Casey & Ethan

Our Chosen Mission

When Ethan and I heard that we would be fundraising to buy flexible seating for our classroom, we didn't exactly know how we could help. Both of us weren't the best at writing persuasively to help, but we were good at one thing- math! We decided that we would take on the job of budgeting and most importantly, making a blueprint of our classroom to use as a guideline for selecting furniture! Below, we detail the process we used to help The Hive figure out which furniture might work the best for our needs.

  • Measure

    To start making the blueprint we first measured the entire classroom. Every inch was recorded on our measurement sheet. Then we had the challenge of getting it on the blueprint. Obviously, we couldn't make it in real size, so we scaled it onto graphing paper. Each square on the graph equaled out to 6" squared in real life. That made it easier to transfer onto the paper. Once we did that we measured and scaled all of the items that would stay in our classroom, like the heater, doorway, window, and closet. 

  • Design

    Next, we had to start trying to figure out which furniture might work within our space. We spent hours with Mrs. B and other students looking through classroom collaborative furniture Websites like SmithSystem.comKI.com, and Ergotron.com.

    To help us weigh the pros and cons of one desk over another, Ethan and I made scale cut-outs of the desk surfaces. We also made representations of the storage options Mrs. B could possibly get to store all of our resources more compactly. The paper cut-outs made it easy for us to work out different furniture arrangements and ensure that they made logical sense in our spaces.

  • Set Our Fundraising Goal

    Finally, we gathered the prices of our top furniture choices and used Google Numbers invoice templates to get a rough idea of how much we should be trying to raise. We made three or four draft invoices and were sure to include things like shipping & handling and taxes, which were surprisingly expensive. This his how we were able to determine a target goal of at least $50,000. 

    $50K sound like a HUGE amount for a group of middle schoolers to raise, but like Mrs. B tells us – the main goal is for us to learn that we shouldn't give up before we even try just because a challenge feels impossible to accomplish. I feel like we've already met our goal. (Well, at least the two of us do!).

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By Casey & Ethan

Class of 2021 • 8th Grade